Go Wild!

Bringing Birds and Wildlife to Woodlands, Farmlands and Big Backyards

Barred Owl

Barred Owl

Washington Conservation District and other Clean Water Partners are working with sportsmen groups and local non-profits to help you bring birds and other wildlife into your backyard.

 

Contact us for a free site visit to learn how you can improve habitat on your property. We'll connect you with information and let you know about available grants.

Improving backyard habitat can be as simple as adding native trees, shrubs and flowers to existing woodlands and gardens. Native plants provide additional food for birds and wildlife, and also attract larval insects that songbirds eat. Bur oak and white oak are excellent choices, as well as smaller trees like serviceberry, redosier dogwood and nannyberry. Even perennial wildflowers like aster, wild strawberry and goldenrod provide food for birds, in addition to attracting butterflies with their colorful blooms.

As well as providing habitat, native trees, shrubs and flowers also help to keep local lakes clean. These plants capture large quantities of rain and melting snow before it causes erosion or runoff pollution. Their deep roots also help to stabilize crumbling stream banks and lakeshores, as well as breaking up compacted soil in residential yards.  

To find native plants that will grow well in your yard, as well as garden designs and partner nurseries and landscaping companies, visit www.BlueThumb.org.

Visit the Clean Water Partners page to learn about grants for planting projects in your area.

 

New England Aster 

New England Aster